The Silk Road Mark

Iris Liu
2019
Oil on canvas
Size:450cmX122cm
The Silk Road Mark is a 4.5-meter masterpiece. Numerous light and beautiful color blocks with different shapes are cut and controlled by an acute angle shaped heavy color block extending from the right side of the picture, forming a strong visual contrast. It is like a visual symphony, with heavy and profound rhythm interspersed in the gorgeous movement, which seems to symbolize the night, war and suffering on the long silk road, It is not only unable to stop and melt the beautiful dream of human cultural integration, but also indicates the formation of a new magnificent world after the cultural integration of Eurasia.

2021 · Winter· #5

Iris Liu
2021
Acrylic Painting
Size:100cmX100cm

2020-3-50

Bin Gui
2020
Ink on Shuan Paper
Size: 90*180cm
The global epidemic in 2020 is spreading, making people feel scared, helpless, thoughtful and helpless. I use rice paper and ink from traditional Chinese painting, the form of contemporary western painting and the avant-garde consciousness of contemporary poetry to create a batch of ink and wash works. I use water and bold color splash-ink to achieve special picture effect naturally. In order to express the human heart of the global epidemic spread of a show, the virus and death and confused feelings. At the same time, it also lets human beings reunderstand the power and mystery of nature, and also advises human beings to fear and respect nature.

Starry Sky NO.4

Yan Mao
Material: Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 50cm×40cm

Starry Sky NO.3

an Mao
Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 50cm×40cm

Starry Sky NO.2

Yan Mao
Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 50cm×40cm

Prayer

Yan Mao
Comprehensive materials
Size: 200cm×250cm

Vitality

Yan Mao
Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 40.5cm×51.5cm
2020 year
Everyone lamented and trembled
Stagnation in the heart
Turned into light and shadow
Hope and love flow
Traveling through time and space and suffering

Starry Sky NO.5

Yan Mao
Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 50cm×40cm

Starry Sky NO.6

Yan Mao
Acrylic on Canvas
Size: 50cm×40cm

Escape II

Liyu Xue
2019
Size: 24"x13.5"
In Escape II, Liyu explores the alternative ways of image-making: by reconstructing the scenes from the film Westworld(1973) with abstract and shadeless painted shapes, he reveals the restless energy embodied within the original composition and offers a radical and somewhat surreal storytelling. His work creates new space for speculation and then becomes a semiautonomous aspect of lived experience for the artist himself as much as the viewer.

The Cure

Jing Liu
2020
Recycle Silver

This piece is designer's reflection of the current pandemic. Her intention is to raise people’s awareness of love and courage to overcome this invisible war against the virus.
More importantly, she would like to raise a more fundamental critical thinking. That is, to think deeper about the origination of viruses and diseases. Could it be that our current life style is to blame for the virus? A life style that involves abusing natural resources, damaging the environmental balance and producing numerous garbage on a daily basis. As such, she started to realize that the pandemic may help us realizing that people need to change their life styles, to cherish the rare blue planet that we have more, to make art pieces with different materials, as garbage is just misplaced materials that we can use creatively to realize their sustainable values.
Silver jewelry will show its unique trace and taste through the use of time, accompanied by an eternal time, every bit of this trace of time will be the most unforgettable memories.

Monk Sha

Ziqi Gui
2020
ink on paper
Size:15.7"x11.8"
Through the modern aesthetic ideas and thinking, the paper ink to reconstruct the image of the sand monk in the Chinese literature "Journey to the West", so that the traditional literary characters and contemporary people have no distance.

2020-10-4

Bin Gui
2020
Ink on Shuan Paper
Size: 90*180cm

My Fair Lady

Ziqing Wei
2019
Ring: 77 x 77 x28 mm
Ear ring: 10.5 x 8.5 mm
Brass, Enamel
The My Fair Lady collection was inspired by the green jewelry on display at the Palace Museum.
Diancui jewelry in the past is the treasure of Chinese princes and nobles. Despite the beauty of the spot, it caused irreversible damage to the kingfisher, which is not allowed to be caught today. However, the beauty of Dianchui jewelry lies not only in the choice of materials, but also in the elements with good meanings used in the production of jewelry. Also as a representative of the Ming and Qing Dynasties jewelry vessels, enamel is an indispensable part. Therefore, in this series of works, I used cold enamel to restore the characteristics of Chinese jewelry and art works. Among them, a large number of elements with Chinese cultural characteristics such as lotus, auspicious clouds, koi are adopted for integration and creation. In terms of color, Chinese watercolor and classic color matching in architecture are also extracted, and the flow sense of color is retained in the coloring to restore the texture of watercolor in Chinese paintings.

Trying to hold hands

David Alpert
Instax square photograph
2021
71mm x 86mm

I live by myself, so this pandemic has forced me to spend a great deal of time alone. My in-person connections come in brief and infrequent moments with a few close friends or outdoors. Otherwise, I am relegated to communicating through screens—skewing scale, physicality, and time. No longer are colleagues occupying human sized spaces—producing corresponding sounds, smells, and vibrations. Instead, their faces appear to me—flattened—encapsulated within gridlocked squares, measuring no bigger than a few inches across. This blurred/pixelated reality is where these two photographs—trying to hold hands and trying to be myself—exist.

Trying to be myself

David Alpert
Instax square photograph
2021
71mm x 86mm

They are part of a series of projected simulations—failed attempts to travel through spacetime— providing simultaneously saddening and comforting moments of reconnection. The photos flatten our temporal perceptions—projecting past images onto new ones. Material objects are digitized and then rematerialized into realistic yet unnatural collages. Computer icons confuse our interpretations of scale while the absence of background light creates a void. My process for this series of photographs is child like in the sense that it mimics external stimuli in the pursuit of intra and inter connection, but—unlike childhood—it is without parents or guardians—forcing me to look inward for support.

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